Japan death by overwork problem

  

Japan overwork

 
 
Japanese work environment is so intense to the extent that people the 1970s invented karoshi, a word that can be translated literally as “overwork death” in Japanese and represents occupational sudden mortality. The major medical cause of karoshi deaths are heart attacks and strokes due to stress, a starvation diet, and long work hours. Korashi also involves employees committing suicides due to overwork.
The first case of karoshi was registered in 1969 when a 29-year-old male working in the shipping department of Japan's largest newspaper company died after suffering from a stroke. It wasn't until 1978 that pattern of people suffering from fatal strokes and heart failure attributed to overwork was brought to light. The term was brought into public usage in 1982 when it was used on a book dealing with the issue.
The term korashi emerged into Japanese public life during the mid-80s “Bubble Economy” when several high-ranking business executives in their prime years suffered from a sudden death without any previous sign of illness. It was then that the phenomenon started to be seen as a serious menace for people in the workforce, which prompted the Japanese Ministry of Labour to start publishing statistics on karoshi in 1987.
Although the initiative was meant to decrease the number of karoshi cases, another employee death due to overwork took place in July 2013. 31-year-old journalist Miwa Sado died of heart failure after logging 159 hours of overtime in one month at the news network NHK. Her death, however, wasn't registered as a karoshi case until October 2017.
Meanwhile, in 2015, a 24-year-old employee of Japanese advertising behemoth Dentsu jumped to her death off a balcony in a company dorm room where she lived after working more than 100 hours in the month leading up to her suicide. Dentsu's president and CEO, Tadashi Ishii, resigned a month after the horrible event.
Japanese work culture
The concept of karoshi can be traced back to the aftermath of World War II. With a war-torn country, Prime Minister Shigeru Yoshida prioritised fostering Japan's economy. One of his initiatives was to prompt major corporations to offer their employees lifelong job security in exchange for workers' loyalty.
Although the plan worked to boost Japan's economy, turning a war-torn country into the largest economy in the world, Japanese workers had to give up work life balance. Within a decade of the start of Yoshida's plan, karoshi cases started to take place. With the purpose of making good impressions on their bosses and due to their loyalty ties with the company, workers started to sacrifice their personal time in favour of their jobs.
The long hours in the office, sleep deprivation and the burden of meeting with their employers' demands started to take a toll in Japanese workers, prompting a number of them to suicide or suffer strokes and heart attacks. These fatalities were recognised as being job-related and the phenomenon was known as “occupation sudden death.”
Despite the population and government's awareness of this ailment, work-life balance in Japan is not much better today. After surveying 10,000 Japanese workers in 2016, a report focused on karoshi cases found that 20% of the respondents worked at least 80 hours of overtime a month. Half of the workers who took part in the survey admitted that they don't take paid vacations. According to the report, 20% of Japanese workers work an overage of 49 hours or longer each week.
Although karoshi used to affect mostly the male force, female case of karoshi are increasingly being reported. Young employees are usually expected to work long hours to climb up the corporate ladder. Some bosses expect employees to arrive early and leave late, which is the case of Takehiro Onuki, a 31-year-old salesman who regularly starts at 8 a.m. and finishes at midnight. The same happens to many other Japanese employees who work in white-collar jobs where hierarchies are quite rigid. Advancement is earned through great strenuous effort. It is not common for workers to leave their jobs, even if they are unhappy or overworked, because starting a new job means starting from scratch and not at the level they left. This leads to a generation of workers who seem to be devoted to their work.

 

Students learn real skills in virtual businesses

  

what virtual business

One thousand three hundred students from every corner of the United States flocked to Pasadena, California, to talk about businesses they had set up. This is not an influx of young entrepreneurs and new startups in the world, as the businesses are completely virtual. Therefore, their products and services are not real and only virtual money is exchanged.

Organised by Virtual Enterprises International, the conference resembled a trade show, housing numerous virtual businesses offering products such as communications technology or food. The New York City-based group says it helps high school students learn modern business skills such as problem solving, communication and technology. The group stated that the project was inspired by the European tradition of apprenticeships in which students learn from people already working in a business or trade.
During the event, students from Miguel Contreras Business and Tourism School in Los Angeles tried to get customers for their virtual business, Big City Tours. The creators, who got some help from their teacher Darrel Iki, said that their business stands out for providing virtual tours to different parts of Los Angeles, providing customers with a a great guide to the city's ethnic heritage, take them to see high-end fashion or visit stores.
Meanwhile, students from Century High School in Santa Ana, California, were selling a translation device designed for travellers. According to students and teachers, the experience of creating a business feels very realistic. Students start with a business plan, then they establish a hierarchy and, according to Iki, they learn to “work together, having a common goal in a potentially successful business.”
Nick Chapman, president and national program director for Virtual Enterprises International, said that students soon realise that operating a business takes a lot of effort and time. “They're running meetings, they're networking, they're meeting with professionals, they're working with mentors, all of the things that are really going to set them apart when they get into college and then move on into their careers,” he stated.
Chapman also said that Virtual Enterprise International program welcomes 13,000 students each year. Students seem quite content with this experience and have declared that working on creating their own business will help them in the future when they enter the real world.
One of the students from Century High School, Miguel Santin, stated that while creating this company, it takes strong communication skills to run a company. He also said that he now understands the pressure of running a company. Working in a virtual company called Taste of the World, he was tasked with overseeing employment and digital media for the virtual company.This virtual company was conceived as a subscription service and it sends samples to customers through the mail.
One of the students from Century High School, Miguel Santin, stated that while creating this company, it takes strong communication skills to run a company. He also said that he now understands the pressure of running a company. Working in a virtual company called Taste of the World, he was tasked with overseeing employment and digital media for the virtual company.This virtual company was conceived as a subscription service and it sends samples to customers through the mail.
“You really need to be hands on with your employees and make sure you guys have strong communication. Otherwise the company just won't prosper as much as you would expect.”
Teacher Alan Gerston, who helped set up Taste of the World, explained, “You sign up for three months, six months, a year, and you receive a snack box with trinkets and information about the company every single month throughout your subscription time.”
“You would pay within our virtual economy,” Gerston said, “using virtual money in a web-based simulated bank system,” he explained. “All the kids in the program have bank accounts…so when they buy something, we give them a receipt,” he added.
Stephen Jarvis, from the Elizabeth Learning Centre in Cudahy, California, told VOA that there is a lot to learn. He added, “It isn't just selling something. It's all the things that go on behind the scenes – creating documents, figuring out if you're making money or losing money.”
Catalina Garcia, a senior who received financial assistance to become a doctor, is a student entrepreneur with the Big City Tours project, and she admitted, “It's helped me a lot because when I was trying to get the scholarship, I went to the interviews, and being in this company has helped me really prepare my presentation skills and be able to talk to other people.”
Despite of what she does in the future and even though she will become a doctor rather than an entrepreneur, Garcia is sure that the skills she has gained creating the virtual project will help her in the future.

 

A wise daughter of Dell

  

business Dell Technologies

Alexa Dell is the daughter of Dell Technologies CEO Michael Dell, who is one of the wealthiest people in the world, with a net worth of nearly $24 billion. Despite being the daughter of a computer industry pioneer, the 24-year old didn't expect to work someday in tech. Considering her family business and the environment she grew up in, however, her journey into the app space seemed inevitable.

According to Alexa, she grew up “having a front seat to the master class” headed by her father in the 90s. She said her father's work and the work of his “for a lock of a better word, his friends” in making the world more connected through personal computers and the World Wide Web.
"The idea that if we can make the world a smaller place with technology, we can really exponentially expand the boundaries of innovation and what's possible within the world," Dell said. "That movement was incredibly intriguing to me, and I wanted to be part of that."
Alexa has many interests
Alexa Dell told Business Insider at the SXSW film festival that her parents, Michael and Susan, encouraged her and her siblings to explore their interests to widen their scope of possibilities and discover their real passion. During her high school years, Alexa Dell worked at fashion houses in New York City every summer.
Despite having a large range of interests, from photography, fashion and editorial, Alexa Dell ended up pursuing a career in tech. Back in 2013, she dropped out of Columbia University to try her luck in the tech industry. Upon leaving college, she started working at a dating app company and the experience allowed her to get a glimpse into life at a startup, an environment where, according to Alexa, a person's good ideas mattered more than their age, status, or gender. This is because startups are constantly evolving and are trying to grow.
"I could much faster and much more efficiently present and execute on my ideas," Dell said, adding: "I knew the space would be best-fitting for the change I wanted to have."
Hard work is key to success
Her efforts have paid off and now she runs a business consulting firm and works as an adviser to dating app company Bumble. Dell believes that it is hard work what leads to success. Accordingly, as a child, she often visited the headquarters of her father's company in Round Rock, Texas.
From the front seat, she watched her father Michael Dell build a multinational corporation out of a startup that was based Michael Dell's freshman year door room. It was during the time Michael Dell was a student at University of Texas at Austin, that he launched the company that once was PC's Limited with only $1,000 family loan.
What she has learnt from her father, according to Alexa, is that you have to dedicate to your business in order to make it. She said, “The advice that he's given me is that hard work is really the foundation of success.” She has also learned from Michael Dell, she said in an interview with Nextshark is that “no matter how successful you are, success means nothing unless it's shared. I really admire him and my mom for all the work they've done through the Michael and Susan Dell Foundation, and I'm so appreciative to have grown up with this mentality.”
Active Lifestyle
According to Alexa, having an active lifestyle is the key to happiness. “Both my parents are very active,” she said, and she learned from them that having a healthy lifestyle can foster productivity at work. Alexa Dell, for instance, prefers to take her conference calls from a treadmill desk located in her home office.
“It's great because your blood is circulating and you can think better, you can think more clearly,” Alexa Dell said. “That's something I kind of learned from them (her parents).”
Alexa Dell also enjoys nature and exercising as a hobby. In an interview with Nextshark, she said, “I love going for a hike with one or two close friends. There are so many trails in LA, and if they're dog friendly I'll bring along my French bulldog Colette! If I have a long weekend, I'll definitely be travelling! I love experiencing new cultures and am inspired by all corners of the world.”

 

Digital Transformation

  

what business Digital Transformation

Digital transformation is the change associated with the integration of digital technology into all areas of a business, deeply changing how it operates and delivers value to customers. What it means by transformation is that digital adoption enables new types of innovation and creativity in a certain domain, rather than simply enhancing and supporting traditional methods. According to author Greg Verdino, digital transformation “closes the gap between what digital customers already expect and what analog businesses actually deliver.”

Digital transformation also entails a cultural change, requiring organisations to constantly challenge the status quo, experience, and get comfortable with failure. Sometimes this means steering the boat away from long-standing business process that companies were built upon to try new practices that are still being tested. Therefore, digital transformation entails questioning traditional methods in favour to new revolutionary practices.
Whether a business is small or a leading corporate, digital transformation (DT) is essential for its survival this day and age. Every study, keynote, panel discussion and report related to how businesses can remain competitive and relevant as the world becomes increasingly digital agrees with this statement, that digital transformation is vital for a business to stay afloat.
Why is digital transformation important?
The most important reason for a business to undergo digital transformation is to survive in the current market. In a contributed article for The Guardian, Howard King said, “Businesses don't transform by choice because it is expensive and risky. Businesses go through transformation when they have failed to evolve,”
Meanwhile, CIO of Vanguard, points out, “Just look at the S&P 500. In 1958, U.S. corporations remained on that index for an average of 61 years, according to the American Enterprise Foundation. By 2011, it was 18 years. Today, companies are being replaced on the S&P approximately every two weeks. Technology has driven this shift, and companies that want to succeed must understand how to merge technology with strategy.”
The IDC research “FutureScape: Worldwide Digital Transformation 2018 Predictions” stated, “By the end of 2019, digital transformation (DX) spending will reach $1.7 trillion worldwide, a 42 percent increase from 2017.” This won't be that easy, however, as IDC's predictions for CIOs in 2018 report, “Through 2019, dragged down by conflicting digital transformation imperatives, ineffective technology innovation, cloud infrastructure transition, and underfunded end-of-life core systems, 75 percent of CIOs and their enterprises will fail to meet all their digital objectives.”
What drives digital transformation?
Technology is the main factor propelling digital transformation forward. However, this process also involves ridding the company of outdated processes and legacy technology. In the healthcare industry, for instance, in spite of the popularity of mobile devices among healthcare providers, “close to 80 percent of clinicians continue to use hospital-provided pages and 49 percent of those clinicians report they receive patient care-related messages most commonly by pager.”
According to research from Forrester, CIOs spend two thirds of their budgets on existing IT concerns, while only one third goes to new projects and innovation. For businesses to evolve this day and age, they must adopt technologies that allow them to boost efficiency. Automation technologies may also enable IT organisations to gain speed and reduce technical debt.
HR and business leaders plea for digital inclusivity
The controversy that has stemmed from Facebook mishandling personal data over the past few years has prompted HR and business leaders to plea organisations to ensure the digital revolution is both inclusive and ethical.
After revelations concerning the alleged misuse of up to 30 million individuals' profiles fuelled an ongoing debate about digitalisation, CIPD chief executive Peter Cheese we are witnessing a fourth industrial revolution that brought with it new responsibilities. He added he things Facebook personal data issue has triggered a moment that “made us realise we need to read the T&Cs and know what's what.”
According to Cheese, there is a large number of the global population are playing out their whole lives on social media without thinking about the consequences. “Regulation has a role to play but it will never solve the problem on its own,” he added.
Chief executive of Business in the Community said, “My plea for digital inclusivity is that we should all fervently pursue humanity in the face of advancing technology.”
Cheese agreed that the digital revolution has changed many jobs and stripped the humanity our of business. He said, “I strongly believe that we can design jobs that make the best of things for people… that we can upskill and reskill them so that people don't get excluded.”

 

All about Big Data in business

  

All about Big Data in business

Whether a business organisation is just starting out or it is already a multinational, it needs valuable data and insights to make the most of its resources and operate strategically. Big Data plays a crucial role for a business to understand its target audience, customers preferences, and even anticipate their needs. For Big Data to help business organisations achieve these goals, it needs to be effectively presented and properly analysed.

What is Big Data?
Now that we now it is important for business organisations and how it can help companies achieve their goals, you might be wondering what big data is. Looking at it simplistically, Big Data is a combination of all the processes and tools used to managing large data sets. Big Data analytics in based on examining vast amounts of data to reveal hidden patterns, correlations and other insights.
The Big Data concept is possible thanks to technology, which enables organisations to analyse their data and get answers from it almost immediately. This process was much slower and less efficient with more traditional business intelligence solutions.
The Big Data concept was conceived due to the need to understand trends, preferences and patterns in the enormous database generated when people interact with different systems and each other. Therefore, Big Data allows business organisations to use analytics to figure out the most valuable customers. It also enables businesses to create new experiences, service and products.
Evolution Big Data analytics
Big Data has become increasingly popular during the past few years. It has become imperative for organisations to understand that they need to capture all the data that streams into their businesses in order to apply analytics and get significant value from it.
The concept of Big Data has been around for years, dating back to the 1950s - decades before anyone used the term “big data - businesses were using basic analytics - which consisted of numbers in a spreadsheet that were analyzed manually - to reveal insights and trends.
The novelty of Big Data is that it brings speed, accuracy and efficiency to the table.While in the past a business would have gathered information, run analytics and unearthed information that could be useful for future decisiones, nwo that business can identify insights for immediate decisions. Big Data allows business to work faster and stay agile, which makes them more competitive in this day and age.
The importance of Big Data analytics
Big Data analytics has been vital for many leading companies to outperform the competition as it helps organisations harness their data and use it to identify new opportunities. In this day and age, the data generated is so vast that it needs an automated program to be able to process it effectively. Many organisations, whether they are new entrants or leading companies, depend on data-driven strategies to compete, capture and innovate. From It to healthcare, organisations in many industries are using Big Data to help them achieve their goals.
As Big Data analytics enables organisations to render their data useful and employ it to identify new opportunities, that leads to smarter business moves, more efficient operations, higher profits and happier customers.
Companies use Big Data for many reasons. First of all, they use it to reduce costs when it comes to storing large amounts of data and identifying more efficient ways of doing business. With the speed of Hadoop and in-memory analytics along with the ability to analyze new sources of data, Big Data allows businesses to analyze information immediately and make decisions accordingly. Lastly, Big Data is important to find out customers' needs through analytics enabling organisations to create products and devise services to satisfy customers' needs.
Who is using Big Data?
Different type of organisations, across many industries, rely on Big Data to make quick, agile decisions and stay competitive. Here are some of the organisations that use Big Data analytics:
The leisure and travel industry depends on customers' satisfaction to succeed. That is where Big Data comes to play an important role in this type of organisations' operations. Companies in this industry, like hotels and casinos, have a short window of opportunity to turn things around when a customer experience goes south, before they start complaining online and damaging the organisation's reputation, deterring others from using its services. Big Data gives these business the ability to gather customer data, analyse it and identify potential problems before it damages the organisation.
Big Data also allows the healthcare industry to effectively manage large amounts information such as patient records, health plans, insurance information and others. With this ability to analyse large amounts of information, healthcare providers can provide diagnoses or treatment options faster.

 

Business in Scotland remain resilient

  

Business in Scotland remain resilient

An industry survey shows that Scottish business remain optimistic in the face of a fragile economy. This analysis was carried out by the Scottish Chambers of Commerce's Quarterly Economic Indicator. According to the study, optimism continued to improve during the third quarter of 2017.

The survey was conducted between August 21 and September 14 2017 to which 384 firms responded.
Optimism was higher year on year in certain industries, such as construction, financial and business services, manufacturing and tourism.
The survey, which is a collaboration with the Fraser of Allander Institute, shows that Scottish businesses “remain resilient” in the face of uncertainty. The study also shows a fragile Scottish economy that continues to grow at below trend levels.
Professor Graeme Roy, of the Institute, however, warned record high employment levels are also causing recruitment difficulties, dampened growth and increased costs.
In a foreword to the report, he said: “In such uncertain times, it is even more important that businesses focus on the long-term drivers of growth that they can control - including innovation, investing in productivity improvements, and developing the skills of their workforce.”
The weak pound's effect on foreign holidays lead to tourism being a leading performer over the third quarter of 2017. Meanwhile, retail and wholesale sector continued to decline, which caused alarm in the field. Sales revenue and cash flow continued to decline along with employment trends. Profitability and capacity also declined.
Despite an increase in customer numbers, SCC's quarterly economic indicator suggested tourism sales revenue fell across the board for the second consecutive quarter. Not only sales revenue fell across the board for the second consecutive quarter, but also investment and employment declined over the quarter.
Therefore, it's important to have a strong performance in the fourth quarter pre-Christmas period.
The construction sector also gave a poor performance, with optimism falling to its lowest level since the third quarter of 2014. However, in spite of the information gathered by the survey, a quarter of the construction firms who responded said they were hiring staff, although they continued to face recruitment difficulties.
Domestic orders and sales revenues were flat, while firms said their performance had been improved by strong export sales. The manufacturing sector, alternatively, reported booming optimism after a mixed year in 2016.
Anderson Strathern director Neil Amner, also chairman of the Scottish Chambers of Commerce Economic Advisory Group, said: “The results in our third quarterly economic indicator of 2017 point to a broadly positive picture for Scottish business.”
“However, the retail sector in particular continues to show decreasing sales, in addition to cashflow and profitability challenges.
“This continues on from our findings in the second quarter which highlighted persistent issues in the retail sector. Levels of inflation have continued to impact on real terms wage growth, which has maintained pressure on household budgets and translated into recurrent challenges for this sector.”
The report found “broad optimism” across Scottish business, especially in the financial and business services sector which displayed strong, positive results. Accordingly, sales and profitability were at their highest levels for several years.
Therefore, the survey is very optimistic, with third quarter optimism levels higher than figures recorded across Q3 2015 and Q3 2016.
Mr Amner added: “For many of our industries, recruitment difficulties continue to sit above the long term trend levels, exacerbated by the record high employment figures.”
“Concerns continue to be raised by our members when it comes to seasonal workers and the attractiveness of the UK to EEA migrants during the uncertainty surrounding the Brexit negotiation process.
“Furthermore, members in more traditional industries have highlighted issues in attracting younger workers.
“Businesses in sectors such as manufacturing must do more to re-imagine their workplaces to attract future talent, by focusing on increasing autonomy and flexibility in their working practices.”
He said that the political situation with Brexit, a general election and moves for a second Scottish independence referendum were creating “uncertainty.”
He added: "As we approach a general election, we expect the political parties to pledge targeted tax cuts, potentially including a temporary cut in VAT, in order to bolster consumer demand."
Scottish Chambers of Commerce (SCC) found profitability and cash flow continued to be “challenging” and pressure on prices was high.

 

Career Quotes

  

Career Quotes what biz

Do you need another job? Do you need a change in your career? If you need motivation to get the job you want, here are some motivational quotes to get you out of the rut.

“Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life.” - Confucius
“It's not what you achieve, it's what you overcome. That's what defines your career.” - Carlton Fisk
“Work to become, not to acquire.” - Elbert Hubbard
“Find out what you like doing best and get someone to pay you for doing it.” - Katherine Whitehorn
“I've missed more than 9,000 shots in my career. I've lost almost 300 games. 26 times, I've been trusted to take the game winning shot and missed. I've failed over and over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed.” - Michael Jordan
“If you want to achieve greatness, stop asking for permission.” - Unknown
“It does not matter how slowly you go as long as you do not stop.” - Confucius
“The most common way people give up their power is by thinking they don't have any.” - Alice Walker
“The truth is that our finest moments are most likely to occur when we are feeling deeply uncomfortable, unhappy, or unfulfilled. For it is only in such moments, propelled by our discomfort, that we are likely to step out of our ruts and start searching for different ways or truer answers.” - M. Scott Peck
“If you don't feel it, flee from it. Go where you are celebrated, not merely tolerated.” - Paul F. Davis
“Failure doesn't mean you are a failure it just means you haven't succeeded yet.” - Robert H. Schuller
“The best way to predict the future is to create it.” - Abraham Lincoln
“Our greatest weakness lies in giving up. The most certain way to succeed is always to try just one more time.” - Thomas A. Edison
“I think everyone should experience defeat at least once during their career. You learn a lot from it.” - Lou Holtz
“I want to look back on my career and be proud of the work, and be proud that I tried everything.” - Jon Stewart
“Dreams are extremely important. You can't do it unless you imagine it.” - George Lucas
“If you can DREAM it, you can DO it.” - Walt Disney
“Desire! That's the one secret of every man's career. Not education. Not being born with hidden talents. Desire.” - Johnny Carson
“I cannot do everything, but I can do something. I must not fail to do the something that I can do.” - Helen Keller
“A mind troubled by doubt cannot focus on the course to victory.” - Arthur Golden
“Opportunities don't happen, you create them.” - Chris Grosser
“Start by doing what is necessary, then what is possible, and suddenly you are doing the impossible.” - Francis of Assisi
“It's not the days in your life, but the life in your days that counts.” - Brian White
“Success is how high you bounce when you hit bottom.” - General George Patton
“The only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven't found it yet, keep looking. Don't settle.” - Steve Jobs
“I was always looking outside myself for strength and confidence, but it comes from within. It is there all the time.‘ - Anna Freud
“Without leaps of imagination or dreaming, we lose the excitement of possibilities. Dreaming, after all is a form of planning.” - Gloria Steinem
“Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great.” - Mark Twain
“When you get into a tight place and everything goes against you until it seems that you cannot hold on for a minute longer, never give up them, for that is just the place and time when the tide will turn.” - Harriet Beecher Stowe
“I was once afraid of people saying, ‘Who does she think she is?‘ Now I have the courage to stand and say, ‘This is who I am.” - Oprah
“Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new.” - Albert Einstein
“Do not be too timid and squeamish about your actions. All life is an experiment.” - Ralph Waldo Emerson
“All you need in this life is ignorance and confidence, and then success is sure.” - Mark Twain

 

Resume Tips from Recruiters

  
cv resume biz
There are many ways to write a resume but nobody is really sure what a recruiter is looking for and a good resume is what sets you apart from the crowd. That's why you need to stand out, so you can be selected for an interview and eventually get the job you want. Here are some tips to help achieve that goal:
Although some people might tell you that you have to lie on your resume, that's not the best advice. First of all, if might get you a job that is just not right for you. You'll find yourself stressed out carrying tasks you are not qualified for. The other alternative is not that great. You might find yourself in a very awkward situation with the recruiter because they might see right through you on the interview and they will realise that you lied on your resume.
Polish your resume. You have to look after the small details because they might make you look bad. For instance, misspellings or grammatical errors might dissuade a recruiter from giving you a chance, no matter how qualified your resume says you are. They think that if you are not able to submit one resume, which is the presentation of your skills, in a neat way, then you are probably going to make sloppy mistakes on the job. You also have to pay close attention when you compose an email and in your cover letter.
Don't fuss about the objective. It has become common practice to include your ultimate career goal on your resume, but this might have nothing to do with the particular position you are applying for. You might want to give this space a better use than writing down your objective.
You might want to just list relevant experience. Remember that recruiters don't have much time to view all the CVs they get and they will probably just skim through yours. That is why it is important to only include relevant experience to the position you are applying for on your resume. Otherwise, they might be overwhelmed by all the information on your CV and ignore the relevant experience you've had. As to the relevant experience, education is not enough. Recruiters want to see you've had unpaid internships, work experience, or volunteer work on your resume.
Apart from your work experience and your education, recruiters also want to see your accomplishments and how you stood out in a particular task.
When it comes to accomplishments and strengths, you don't have to include your personal skills. Let the recruiter see that for himself/herself on the interview. Focus instead on your work experience, accomplishments, degrees earned, and contact information on your resume.
Regardless of how wonderful your resume is, you also need to submit a cover letter. The cover letter allows you to be more creative and let your personality shine through while you explain your experiences, education, and accomplishments and why they are relevant to the position you are applying for. You also have to take care of the details on your cover letter, avoiding the misspellings, grammar errors, untruths and other common mistakes that could make you like a less-than-ideal candidate.
Make sure you add the phone and email address you use most often, so you don't miss out on an opportunity by failing to respond to their invitation to an interview on time.
At the top of your CV, add a summary of your experience and include specific experience that is relevant to the job to which you are applying.
Hays, a leading British company providing recruitment and human resources services, also advises you to “work backwards from your most recent job and don't leave any gaps (if you travelled, say so); if you are a graduate without much experience, highlight the relevant skills that you gained in your course; list your highest qualifications by institution, course name and grade achieved; make sure to include any training courses or professional/industry standard qualifications; include any memberships to chartered institutes or relevant organisations.”
At the end of the resume, you should state that “references are available on request.” However, you don't actually have to include references at that stage, unless asked to do so.

 

Creative, Marketing and Digital salary survey

  

Digital salary survey

The Drum has published a survey that sheds light across salaries, bonuses, job satisfaction, job security and gender differences. The study has also found some distinct trends across our key specialisms.

The political turbulence that characterised last year - such as Brexit and the US - has had a minimal impact on recruitment and hiring. Although there was a small setback in the latter part of 2016, confidence in the UK economy has recovered.
There is a high demand for good people across all business types and specialisms, particularly in agencies and for those working in digital and creative. There appears to be a trend in which clients bring teams in-house as well as using agencies.
According to the Financial Times, UK Government's Strategy Unit has drafted a report which concluded that the creative industries in London are now more important than financial services to the economy. While there is more employment in the creative industries, it is decreasing in financial services.
All disciplines have seen pay rises, either by progression within the same company or by moving jobs. The highest pay rises were witnessed in planning & strategy (14 percent), account handling (38 percent) and tech/UX (37 percent). Every category received a pay rise over 10 percent above the national average of 3 percent.
The study found that the major reason for people wishing to leave their jobs limited career progression in their current role. The second one was remuneration.
The report forecasts a good future for tech companies related to software. Automation, programmatic, AI and continued integration are all areas that are expected to grow.
There is a high satisfaction across creative marketing and digital disciplines, with 70 percent being largely satisfied in their current role. Content, editorial and social report the highest satisfaction levels, followed by PR and marketing.
As to the benefits, “the need for a better work-life balance has become increasingly more desirable for all, with flexible working the most sought after benefit. This was favoured even over a bonus,” reported The Drum.
Those in the industry are also well-educated, with an average of 84 percent with a degree or Masters.
The industry with the highest budget is digital market. “33 percent of our survey working in digital marketing have a budget of £1m+” stated The Drum.
The survey was put together by Major Players, which used data collected from 3,200 respondents combined with savvy provided by industry experts.
Major players also found certain trends in the industry. For instance, there is a higher proportion of men in the industry at a 65/35 ratio. Also, 25 percent received a pay increase of more than 10 percent, about average across all areas. The study also shows that most 35 percent see their career progressing within a medium-sized agency.
The study also found that workers value flexible hours and a greater holiday allowance more than a bonus.
Another study by Morgan McKinely shows that 2016 was a great year of growth and opportunity for marketing professionals across financial services, technology and retail industries.
“Marketing is becoming a higher-priority on C-suite executives' growth plans, with team sizes increasing up to 50% and budgets becoming healthier. This stands in stark contrast with previous years and moves away from the trend of cost-cutting and redundancies,” it states.
“There is always an element of seasonality to marketing recruitment, with permanent hires being more prevalent in Q2 and Q3 following bonus season as well as in the lead up to appraisals and salary reviews in Q4, and contract hiring being busier in the first few months of the year, Q2 and Q3. In 2016, due to a lack of predictability in the economic climate there was an element of unpredictability in marketing recruitment trends, with August being the busiest it's been in a while.”
While traditional marketing, branding and event management have been slower areas of recruitment than content marketing and external communications in London. Given that we live in an information-driven society, content and communications have been at the forefront of marketing strategy. As a result, there has been a demand for skilled writers and communicators to lead organisations both digitally and off-line in their marketing communications strategies.
Content writing has been rebranded. What used to be an integral part of a marketer's responsibility is now seen as a job in its own right.

 

How to be a better team player at work

  

How to be a better team player at work

The best coworkers are those who share expertise, give constructive criticism or valuable feedback, or make a project succeed. That all looks good on paper, but in real life, it's not so easy to become the perfect coworker. Image from asana.com

Unfortunately, working well in a team heavily depends on your personality and this becomes particularly hard if you are introvert. When your job requires team work, your career success doesn't only depend on your skills, but also on your abilities as a team player because we all know there's no “I” in team.
Working too much and spending too much time around your colleagues doesn't guarantee success either. People who are stressed out and burnt out are more likely to perform worse on the job. In fact, research shoes that people who use all their days off are more likely to get raises down the line. Plus, you are not in most your sociable, affable behaviour when you are stressed out and worn out.
Although you might think that the best team players are the ones who work hard and are always there when you need, research shows that people who have many activities after work are the best team players. According to a 2015 paper in Business and Society looking at 347 workers at 80 companies in Canada and China, people who ranked higher in engagement with the community were those more likely to be trusted by their colleagues.
“Hiring managers often dismiss volunteer work and community involvement as irrelevant, or even a potential distraction,” stated Ilan Vertinsky, one of the paper's authors. “But really, people with busy evening and weekend schedules are exactly who should be getting hired.”
Don't let bullies get you down. Bullying is not a phenomenon restricted to schools. It also takes place in the workplace and more often than you might think. According to a 2015 survey from the staffing company Office Team, 1 in 3 employees reported being bullied at work. Out of those, 13 percent admitted this situation was the catalyst for their resignation, while 17 percent of them took no action after being bullied.
A 2015 study of 327 Spanish employees published in Anxiety, Stress and Coping: An International Journal showed that bullying in the workplace can cause a vicious cycle since people who get bullied are more likely to find themselves in the same situation in the future.
The way to end this vicious cycle is to confront your bullies and stand up to them. If you don't want confront them, you can simply report this person to hold the bully accountable. However, if someone is highly critical of your work, you can simply ask them what they would have done differently.
Being an endless source of opinions and perspectives can be important, it can also backfire and be bad for teams. Research suggests interfering with projects by pointing out what is wrong with them can frustrate its momentum. If everyone has an opinion on anything, nothing will get done.
So how can you be proactive yet supportive of your colleagues? It all comes down to the way you deliver your message. Research suggests that you need to provide about five times as much positive support for the ideas of others as you provide negative feedback.
Although it might be tricky and time consuming to provide positive feedback when you have a deadline to meet, it does mean that your colleagues will be more appreciative of your alternative plans, goals or benchmarks.
Some of us tend to listen to music on our way to work, but does everyone know that this music can affect your performance and work environment. According to a 2016 study of 266 adults in the Journal of Organisation Behaviour, cheerful music seems to improve people's moods, helping them to be more cooperative and efficient in decision-making.
Although gossip is frowned upon, research shows that some kinds of gossip can actually bring about numerous psychological benefits and can also help teams work better as a group.
This kind of gossip, however, has to be positive in order to have a good impact in the workplace. If you hear how someone got a promotion, it might help you learn from what they've done to make it so you can follow in their footsteps. Therefore, it helps to improve productivity at work.

 

  
1  2  3  4  5  6 
  
Page 1 of 6
up Top